Geowissenschaften

Hydrosphäre - Grundwasser

Grundwasser

Grundwasser leitet seine Zusammensetzung aus einer Vielzahl von Prozessen ab, einschließlich Auflösungs-, Hydrolyse- und Fällungsreaktionen ; Adsorption und Ionenaustausch; Oxidation und Reduktion ; Gasaustausch zwischen Grundwasser und Atmosphäre ; und biologische Prozesse.

Prozesse, die die wichtigsten chemischen Bestandteile des Grundwassers beeinflussen
Komponente Ursprung*
* Die Quellen für jeden Bestandteil sind in ungefährer Reihenfolge abnehmender Bedeutung angegeben.
Quelle: Adaptiert von Elizabeth Kay Berner und Robert A. Berner, Der globale Wasserkreislauf: Geochemie und Umwelt, Copyright 1987, Tabelle 4.6, S. 170. Wiedergabe mit Genehmigung von Prentice Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Natriumion Natriumchloridauflösung (etwas umweltschädlich)
Plagioklasverwitterung
Regenwasserzugabe
Kaliumion Biotit-Verwitterung
K-Feldspat-Verwitterung
Biomasse nimmt ab
Auflösung von eingeschlossenen Aerosolen
Magnesiumion Verwitterung durch Amphibol und Pyroxen
Verwitterung von Biotit (und Chlorit)
Dolomitverwitterung
Olivin Verwitterung
Regenwasserzugabe
Calciumion Calcitverwitterung
Plagioklasverwitterung
Dolomitverwitterung
Auflösung von eingeschlossenen Aerosolen
Biomasse nimmt ab
Bicarbonation Verwitterung von Calcit und Dolomit
Silikatverwitterung
Sulfation Pyritverwitterung (einige umweltschädlich)
Regenwasserzugabe
Chlorid-Ion Natriumchloridauflösung (etwas umweltschädlich)
Regenwasserzugabe
Wasserstoffsilikat Silikatverwitterung

Die wichtigsten biologischen Prozesse sind der mikrobielle Stoffwechsel , die organische Produktion und die Atmung (Oxidation). Der mit Abstand wichtigste Gesamtprozess für die Hauptbestandteile des Grundwassers ist der der Mineralwasserreaktionen, die oben in Fluss- und Ozeangewässern kurz beschrieben wurden . Somit ist die Zusammensetzung reflektiert von Grundwasser stark die Arten von Gestein Mineralien , dass das Wasser in ihrer Bewegung durch den Untergrund gestoßen.

In general, the most mobile elements in groundwater—i.e., those most easily liberated by the weathering of rock minerals—are calcium, sodium, and magnesium. Silicon and potassium have intermediate mobilities, and aluminum and iron are essentially immobile and locked up in solid phases.

Groundwaters are highly susceptible to contamination because of human activities and the fact that their dissolved constituents are derived to a large extent from the leaching of surface materials. Some of the nitrogen and phosphorus applied to soils as fertilizers and organic pesticides may be leached and leak into groundwater systems, leading to increased concentrations of ammonium and phosphate. Radioactive wastes, industrial chemicals, household materials, and mine refuse are other anthropogenic sources of dissolved substances that have been detected in groundwater systems.

Ice

Ice is nearly a pure solid and, as such, accommodates few foreign ions in its structure. It does contain, however, particulate matter and gases, which are trapped in bubbles within the ice. The change in composition of these materials through time, as recorded in the successive layers of ice, has been used to interpret the history of Earth’s surface environment and the impact of human activities on this environment. The increase in the lead content of continental glacial ice with decreasing age of the ice up to the middle of the 1970s, for example, reflects the progressive input of tetraethyl lead into the global environment from gasoline burning. (Stringent environmental regulations that appeared in the 1970s regarding the use of leaded gasoline has led to a fall in lead concentrations in ice laid down since that time.) Also, atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane concentrations, which have increased significantly during the past century because of anthropogenic activities, are faithfully recorded in ice bubbles of the thick continental ice sheets. By 2016 atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane concentrations had increased by more than 43 percent and more than 150 percent, respectively, higher than their concentrations 200 years ago; the latter concentration values were obtained from measurements of the gases in air trapped in ice.